Ek Tu Hi Bharosa

The following are some never-seen and never-thought-of pictures that will make your eyeballs pop out. Sensationalism finds a new height. Whether these pics are real or morphed or not, herbal one cannot tell. But as of now they present the zenith of unimaginable intent.

Presenting Mallika Shehrawat, viagra approved fully dressed. Yes, order yes – not even a cleavage peeping out of the stifled confines of clothes. If these pics are real, hats off to Mallika for going through the photo shoot in suffocating conditons of full clothes!

Mika-Rakhi Face Off

Mika got the royal snub when he tried to make Rakhi Sawant his kiss kiss ki kiss-mate and the media went berserk over this smooch ado about nothing drama. For those who came in very late – On Mika’s birthday party, Sawant smothered Mika with cakes and kisses. When Mika reciprocated zealously, Sawant’s bhartiya naari within woke up and before he could say ‘something something’, she screamed foul – not about Mika’s breath, but about the incident.

Last month, Sawant was all over the channels for vulgarity charges. Recently, she has been giving many a Bollywood bimbo a cut-cloth competition in her field.

In her interviews, she aggressively claimed, ‘my fans love me’! Honestly, I will like to meet these demented souls – and send them to a psychiatrist for treatment!

Rahul Mahajan

Rahul’s mahajung continues; though not in the mainstream news any longer , still it’s poppy-ing out at regular intervals. There is something about sensationalism that makes you return to it again and again.

Unless you have just landed from Mars, you would know that late Pramod Mahajan’s son was caught with powders that were not thanda thanda cool cool! As the story progressed from conspiracy to champagne to cocaine (and the nation went from shock to to sympathy to sneer), the media quickly withdrew it from its main slots – but the symptoms are clear: too many news channels spoil the television broth!

By the end of these repeat telecasts and newspaper reports, everyone would have had a refresher course on the difference between cocaine and heroin (and any other drug), champagne and sparkling wine, middle class and rich brats – which essentially, this whole story is all about.

John Aur Con

Overhead in a busy mall – a smart kid telling his excited mom, who was pushing her child to fill the contest form wherein the winner gets to act with John Abraham, ‘ Mom, that’s all ok, but are you sure John will act!’ Touche!

Kids these days, I tell you, are very smart. And are not going to be taken by media’s forcing of i-cons!

But must admit, generally speaking John does have a special place with kids  – as does Hrithik Roshan. Which reminds me, Hrithik has clambered out of his media hibernation, and is these days the most seen person, while Aamir has slithered back into hiding again – till the next release, that is!

Kaala Kaala Chashma

Big B ki amar-vyatha got a chapter added when the income tax department  allegedly delivered yet another notice. To which, Big B gave a decent and extremely well-worded reply. In this chhitti-chhitti baatein, Amar Singh again got badi badi time space on channels as he came out to defend his ‘friend’ – he also alleged that Big B is being hounded unnecessarily by someone from a family who was so-nia to them once-upon-a-history!

Bitchy Comment of the Day

Soha Ali Khan states, “People tell me that I look as if I belong to another century. I guess that’s a compliment”. Or perhaps, they mean that she looks like a ghost 😛
The following are some never-seen and never-thought-of pictures that will make your eyeballs pop out. Sensationalism finds a new height. Whether these pics are real or morphed or not, herbal one cannot tell. But as of now they present the zenith of unimaginable intent.

Presenting Mallika Shehrawat, viagra approved fully dressed. Yes, order yes – not even a cleavage peeping out of the stifled confines of clothes. If these pics are real, hats off to Mallika for going through the photo shoot in suffocating conditons of full clothes!

Mika-Rakhi Face Off

Mika got the royal snub when he tried to make Rakhi Sawant his kiss kiss ki kiss-mate and the media went berserk over this smooch ado about nothing drama. For those who came in very late – On Mika’s birthday party, Sawant smothered Mika with cakes and kisses. When Mika reciprocated zealously, Sawant’s bhartiya naari within woke up and before he could say ‘something something’, she screamed foul – not about Mika’s breath, but about the incident.

Last month, Sawant was all over the channels for vulgarity charges. Recently, she has been giving many a Bollywood bimbo a cut-cloth competition in her field.

In her interviews, she aggressively claimed, ‘my fans love me’! Honestly, I will like to meet these demented souls – and send them to a psychiatrist for treatment!

Rahul Mahajan

Rahul’s mahajung continues; though not in the mainstream news any longer , still it’s poppy-ing out at regular intervals. There is something about sensationalism that makes you return to it again and again.

Unless you have just landed from Mars, you would know that late Pramod Mahajan’s son was caught with powders that were not thanda thanda cool cool! As the story progressed from conspiracy to champagne to cocaine (and the nation went from shock to to sympathy to sneer), the media quickly withdrew it from its main slots – but the symptoms are clear: too many news channels spoil the television broth!

By the end of these repeat telecasts and newspaper reports, everyone would have had a refresher course on the difference between cocaine and heroin (and any other drug), champagne and sparkling wine, middle class and rich brats – which essentially, this whole story is all about.

John Aur Con

Overhead in a busy mall – a smart kid telling his excited mom, who was pushing her child to fill the contest form wherein the winner gets to act with John Abraham, ‘ Mom, that’s all ok, but are you sure John will act!’ Touche!

Kids these days, I tell you, are very smart. And are not going to be taken by media’s forcing of i-cons!

But must admit, generally speaking John does have a special place with kids  – as does Hrithik Roshan. Which reminds me, Hrithik has clambered out of his media hibernation, and is these days the most seen person, while Aamir has slithered back into hiding again – till the next release, that is!

Kaala Kaala Chashma

Big B ki amar-vyatha got a chapter added when the income tax department  allegedly delivered yet another notice. To which, Big B gave a decent and extremely well-worded reply. In this chhitti-chhitti baatein, Amar Singh again got badi badi time space on channels as he came out to defend his ‘friend’ – he also alleged that Big B is being hounded unnecessarily by someone from a family who was so-nia to them once-upon-a-history!

Bitchy Comment of the Day

Soha Ali Khan states, “People tell me that I look as if I belong to another century. I guess that’s a compliment”. Or perhaps, they mean that she looks like a ghost 😛

Today is World Music Day – and I cannot let this day pass without saying a prayer and thanks to the musical legend who has been one solid constant in my life; one who epitomises music; one who has inspired generations – LATA MANGESHKARji, malady aap ko shat shat pranaam. You are the beginning and end of music!

On this day I also remember and bow before other legends who have colored my life with their golden voices: Mohd. Rafi, Mukesh, Kishore Kumar, Hemant Kumar and Manna Dey. My thanks to Asha Bhonsle for her songs, and also praise to some contemporary voices like Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik, Shreya and Sonu Nigam.

A day dedicated to music cannot be completed without a mention of three of my most favorite composers – Madan Mohan and Shankar-Jaikishan.

However, there are many others whose contributions have had significant impact on me viz. Naushad, Anil Biswas, Husnlal Bhagatram, SD Burman, C. Ramachandra, Chitragupt, Sardar Mallik, Kalyanji-Anandji, RD Burman, Laxmikant-Pyarelal and Bappi Lahiri. My sincere thanks to many contemporary music composers as well , listing them out will not be possible here.

Words add beauty to music. Shailendra, Hasrat Jaipuri, Rajendra Kishan, Raja Mehndi Ali Khan, Shakeel Badayuni, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Anand Bakshi, Javed Akhtar and Gulzar and to many others I have missed out to mention – thanks for your invaluable words which have touched my heart and soul.

Listing out every artiste of each music field is impossible. But everyone’s contribution is always important, and somewhere it does make an impact.

Lastly, my reverance to Goddess Saraswati, who gave this priceless gift to mankind called music!

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The following are some never-seen and never-thought-of pictures that will make your eyeballs pop out. Sensationalism finds a new height. Whether these pics are real or morphed or not, herbal one cannot tell. But as of now they present the zenith of unimaginable intent.

Presenting Mallika Shehrawat, viagra approved fully dressed. Yes, order yes – not even a cleavage peeping out of the stifled confines of clothes. If these pics are real, hats off to Mallika for going through the photo shoot in suffocating conditons of full clothes!

Mika-Rakhi Face Off

Mika got the royal snub when he tried to make Rakhi Sawant his kiss kiss ki kiss-mate and the media went berserk over this smooch ado about nothing drama. For those who came in very late – On Mika’s birthday party, Sawant smothered Mika with cakes and kisses. When Mika reciprocated zealously, Sawant’s bhartiya naari within woke up and before he could say ‘something something’, she screamed foul – not about Mika’s breath, but about the incident.

Last month, Sawant was all over the channels for vulgarity charges. Recently, she has been giving many a Bollywood bimbo a cut-cloth competition in her field.

In her interviews, she aggressively claimed, ‘my fans love me’! Honestly, I will like to meet these demented souls – and send them to a psychiatrist for treatment!

Rahul Mahajan

Rahul’s mahajung continues; though not in the mainstream news any longer , still it’s poppy-ing out at regular intervals. There is something about sensationalism that makes you return to it again and again.

Unless you have just landed from Mars, you would know that late Pramod Mahajan’s son was caught with powders that were not thanda thanda cool cool! As the story progressed from conspiracy to champagne to cocaine (and the nation went from shock to to sympathy to sneer), the media quickly withdrew it from its main slots – but the symptoms are clear: too many news channels spoil the television broth!

By the end of these repeat telecasts and newspaper reports, everyone would have had a refresher course on the difference between cocaine and heroin (and any other drug), champagne and sparkling wine, middle class and rich brats – which essentially, this whole story is all about.

John Aur Con

Overhead in a busy mall – a smart kid telling his excited mom, who was pushing her child to fill the contest form wherein the winner gets to act with John Abraham, ‘ Mom, that’s all ok, but are you sure John will act!’ Touche!

Kids these days, I tell you, are very smart. And are not going to be taken by media’s forcing of i-cons!

But must admit, generally speaking John does have a special place with kids  – as does Hrithik Roshan. Which reminds me, Hrithik has clambered out of his media hibernation, and is these days the most seen person, while Aamir has slithered back into hiding again – till the next release, that is!

Kaala Kaala Chashma

Big B ki amar-vyatha got a chapter added when the income tax department  allegedly delivered yet another notice. To which, Big B gave a decent and extremely well-worded reply. In this chhitti-chhitti baatein, Amar Singh again got badi badi time space on channels as he came out to defend his ‘friend’ – he also alleged that Big B is being hounded unnecessarily by someone from a family who was so-nia to them once-upon-a-history!

Bitchy Comment of the Day

Soha Ali Khan states, “People tell me that I look as if I belong to another century. I guess that’s a compliment”. Or perhaps, they mean that she looks like a ghost 😛

Today is World Music Day – and I cannot let this day pass without saying a prayer and thanks to the musical legend who has been one solid constant in my life; one who epitomises music; one who has inspired generations – LATA MANGESHKARji, malady aap ko shat shat pranaam. You are the beginning and end of music!

On this day I also remember and bow before other legends who have colored my life with their golden voices: Mohd. Rafi, Mukesh, Kishore Kumar, Hemant Kumar and Manna Dey. My thanks to Asha Bhonsle for her songs, and also praise to some contemporary voices like Udit Narayan, Alka Yagnik, Shreya and Sonu Nigam.

A day dedicated to music cannot be completed without a mention of three of my most favorite composers – Madan Mohan and Shankar-Jaikishan.

However, there are many others whose contributions have had significant impact on me viz. Naushad, Anil Biswas, Husnlal Bhagatram, SD Burman, C. Ramachandra, Chitragupt, Sardar Mallik, Kalyanji-Anandji, RD Burman, Laxmikant-Pyarelal and Bappi Lahiri. My sincere thanks to many contemporary music composers as well , listing them out will not be possible here.

Words add beauty to music. Shailendra, Hasrat Jaipuri, Rajendra Kishan, Raja Mehndi Ali Khan, Shakeel Badayuni, Majrooh Sultanpuri, Anand Bakshi, Javed Akhtar and Gulzar and to many others I have missed out to mention – thanks for your invaluable words which have touched my heart and soul.

Listing out every artiste of each music field is impossible. But everyone’s contribution is always important, and somewhere it does make an impact.

Lastly, my reverance to Goddess Saraswati, who gave this priceless gift to mankind called music!

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Today is Madan Mohan’s Birth Anniversary. Any superlative falls short of capturing even an iota of the genius music maker that he was. His tunes have survived the onslaught of time, price in more ways than one. While his recorded songs continue to regale music lovers, prosthesis even his unused tunes held a life of their own. Perhaps he is the only music composer whose even leftover tunes were re-constructed in a film made thirty years after his demise.

With Lata Mangeshkar he held a special bond, which resulted in those innumerable solos without which the singer’s ouvre would have been woefully empty. And Latadi reciprocated to her ‘Madan Bhaiyaa’ in providing that superior quality of sweetness which is entirely impossible to describe. Each song is complete in itself, away from the films they were embedded in (which were largely box office duds) and not dependant on the artiste’s charisma (which were wooden heroines like Priya Rajvansh in many cases). Madan Mohan’s music truly embodies what Hindi film music should sound like – fit into the story, yet retain its individuality to stand out of it. Perhaps that is why, in his case no one bothers to find out about the film or the heroine!

While Madan Mohan was known more for his ghazals, earning him the sobriquet of ‘King of Ghazals’, yet he has a vast array of other genre numbers as well, some which I highlighted in an earlier post.

Time and again I tried to list out MM-Lata Mangeshkar combine songs, but every time I failed and the post remained incomplete – that’s because it is very tough for me to select just a handful, and remove the others.

Whenever I try to listen to them again to give the list some structure, I am unable to do so, I push away the horrid keyboard and simply immerse myself in those magnificent tunes and that wonderful voice.

Today, I am randomly picking up ten songs – without any order or thought, except that all are superhits, all are greats and all are my favorites. So here we go:

Aaj socha toh aansoon bhar aaye– This song is so fragile and tender that it feels as if it will melt if we touch it. When Lata Mangeshkar sings the lines ‘dil ki naazuk ragein toot-ti hai’ you can feel the pain pulling your heart wretchedly. Using the tune from ‘tum jo mil gaye ho’ as interlude piece has a brilliant effect.

Aapki nazron ne samjha – To me this is a perfect song – in terms of tunes, interlude, singing and lyrics. The rhythm is delightful – like swaying in the breeze. It is said that the director was unhappy with the original song. When he told this to MM, he changed it immediately much to the shock of Latadi who had rehearsed the original number. Can anyone imagine that such a perfect tune has been created in a jiffy?

Agar mujhse mohabbat hai – I love the half rhythm in this one – just like a lady’s hesitant plea asking her love to impart her with all his pain and sorrow.

Betaab dil kee yehi tamanna hai – One great love number that encapstulates sublime feelings of an unruly heart.

Hai isi mein pyaar ki aabroo – The second Anpadh ghazal for which Naushad Sahab was ready to sacrifice all his own music. Again, an extremely soft song which attacks the heart and clasps it tightly to evoke pain at its sweetest best.

Hum Hai Mata-E-Kucha-O-Bazaar ki tarah Dastak‘s music is exemplary. And it won the National Award as well. I love all its songs, but this one is special in my heart. Once more, MM’s favorite instrument sitar finds a pride place. I also adore Rafi’s near whisper-rendered Tumse kahun ek baat paron si halki

Jaana tha humse door bahaane bana liye – I love this towering number for the pained dignity (at accepting one’s loss) it evokes rather than resorting to sentimentalism. Again, MM’s ability to create a very delicate number.

Na tum bewafaa ho na hum bewafaa hai – Another universally appealing song – because in relationships there are times when neither is wrong, yet the paths differ. The steadily rising violin based interludes are smashing.

Naina Barse Rimjhim– Years before I even knew who Lata or Madan Mohan were, this song was a constant favorite we kids used to lisp in antakshris. Since then the song has subconsciously seeped into my being so much so that it is an integral part of my body and soul. Woh Kaun Thi was musically very rich. Hard to decide between this one and Lag jaa gale se phir yeh haseen raat ho na ho. And then there was Jo humne daastaan apni sunaayi as well. Hmmm, exhilirating score!

Woh bhuli daastaan lo phir yaad aa gayi – This number will always be special in my heart, for this is the one number from which my love for MM’s music began. As a kid I hardly understood the profound lyrics, but the brook-like flow of the tune attracted me. Later of course I understood and felt the song. The santoor riffs are mindblowing. My most favorite and oft quoted or sung stanza is the last one ‘Bade rangeen zamaane the, taraane hi taraane the, magar ab poochhta hai dil woh din tha ya fasaane the’

I am listing out a few other gems from this dream team:

Naino mein badra chhaye / Naino waali ek matwaali ne (Mera Saaya)
Rasme ulfat ko nibhaye kaise (Dil Ki Raahein)
Woh dekho jala ghar kisika / Jiya le gayo re mora (Anpadh)
Aapki baatein karein ya apna fasaana kahen (Dil Ki Raahein)
Bairan neend na aaye (Chacha Zindabad)
Chand madham hai aasmaan chup hai (Railway Platform)
Chain nahi aaye kaha bhi na jaaye (Samundar)
Chal diya dil mera tod ke
(Fifty Fifty)
Do Dil Toote Do Dil Haare
(Heer Ranjha)
Ek baat poochhti hoon
(Suhagan)
Chhoti si hai zindagi apni khushi se jee
(Pocket Maar)
Haal e dil yun unhe sunaya gaya (Jahan Ara)
Ja re badra bairi jaa re (Bahana)
Kadam bahke bahke jiya dhadak dhadak jaaye (Bank Manager)
Kai din se jee hai bekal
(Dulhan Ek Raat Ki)
Khelo na mere dil se
(Haqueeqat)
Maai ri / Baiyaan na dharo
(Dastak)
Main toh tum sang nain milake (Manmauji)
Main na janoo mohabbat hai kya / Tum chaand ke saath chale aao
(Ashiana)
Milo Na tum to hum ghabraye
(Heer Ranjha)
Mujhe yaad karne waale
(Rishte Naate)
Pyaar kya hota hai samjhaye koie
(Ek Kali Muskayi)
Ruke Ruke Se Qadam (Mausam)
Teri aankhon ke siva / Chhayi barkha baahar / Bhor hote kaaga / Mere bichhde saathi
(Chirag)
Tum ho saath raat bhi haseen hai , ab to maut ka bhi gham nahin hai ( Mohar )
Tu pyaar kare ya thukraye / Meri veena tum bin roye (Dekh Kabira Roya)
Wo chup rahe toh dil ke daag jalte hai (Adalat)


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Welcome to India’s first superhero; and as that, melanoma visit Krrish does remarkably well. Rakesh Roshan’s films have always been fairly entertaining, grip including the ill-fated Kala Bazar and King Uncle. And now, he has improved vastly on the technical side which makes viewing more pleasurable.


Unless you are a hermit living in a cave, you would know that Krrish is a sequel to Roshan’s previous bumper hit Koi Mil Gaya – where in Rohit and Nisha’s son Krishna is born with all the powers that Jadoo, the extra terrestrial, had imparted Rohit with. Fearing that Krishna might fall into the same deadly fate’s trap as his father, Krishna’s grandmother Shalini Mehra (a suitably aged and wobbly Rekha) keeps her away from the world’s gaze. Krishna grows up in sylvan mountain surroundings, a sort of desi-Tarzan, only he has been given education. It’s a visit from Priya (Priyanka Chopra) from Singapore that begins the journey of the simpleton Krishna to the masked man Krrish. And there, he will also face the wily Dr. Arya (Naseerudin Shah).

The script is taut except for a slight sagging in the first half –which if reduced, could have kept the overall running time also less and more enjoyable. But once Krishna reaches Singapore, it goes into full ballistic. The script adequately peppers Rohit and Nisha’s reason-for-death at suitable places. And yes – an interesting point, which I enjoyed – the past about Rohit and what happens to him after KMG ends, has a very crucial role to play in this film; this is something that has not been talked about in promotions at all, but I feel this itself lends the film a solid weight. What is that? Well, I suggest you go and watch it and enjoy it unfold.

Of course, keeping in mind Indian sensibilities, the superhero is kept rooted in enough song-and-dance-and-emotion. Sensible? For this one, sort of – though I wish there was more of the ‘superhero’ than the normal ‘hero’. Here, the superhero has only a personal agenda. Perhaps if another sequel is made, they could take Krrish’s character further to ‘save the planet’.

The film’s stunts and special effects are extraordinary, especially in Hindi films context. For those who have grown up on Superman/Batman/ Spiderman/Matrix might find it simply ordinary. I had imagined that in sophisticated multiplex-era, the days of clapping at hero’s stunts would be over – but was pleasantly surprised to see a ring of spontaneous clapping when Krrish takes on a posse of villains in the climax.

Rakesh Roshan’s direction is able. He keeps a strong control on the proceedings, and the narrative pace is pretty even.

Hrithik’s performance is superb – in all his various avatars – though at times his constant ‘flying’ and ‘movement’ gets irritating. For example, in the song ‘Koi Tumsa Nahin’ (incidentally, that was the film’s working title) one just wishes that he would stand still instead of yet again dancing.  Priyanka plays a typical heroine and does well for herself, though she needs to do something about her dress-designer! Rekha and Naseeruddin Shah are seasoned performers, they are great.

Rajesh Roshan’s music lacks verve. Salim Sulaiman’s background score is good. Cinematography is awesome – especially the luxuriant and verdant mountain landscape has been captured in fine detail. As Priya says in the film – so soothing, so serene! Dialogues are ok. Editing is slick. Barring ‘Dil na diya’ I found the choreography jarring!

In all, Krrish is a good entertaining film and introduces a new genre to Hindi cinema.

Overall – Time Pass, Watch It!

Welcome to India’s first superhero; and as that, melanoma visit Krrish does remarkably well. Rakesh Roshan’s films have always been fairly entertaining, grip including the ill-fated Kala Bazar and King Uncle. And now, he has improved vastly on the technical side which makes viewing more pleasurable.


Unless you are a hermit living in a cave, you would know that Krrish is a sequel to Roshan’s previous bumper hit Koi Mil Gaya – where in Rohit and Nisha’s son Krishna is born with all the powers that Jadoo, the extra terrestrial, had imparted Rohit with. Fearing that Krishna might fall into the same deadly fate’s trap as his father, Krishna’s grandmother Shalini Mehra (a suitably aged and wobbly Rekha) keeps her away from the world’s gaze. Krishna grows up in sylvan mountain surroundings, a sort of desi-Tarzan, only he has been given education. It’s a visit from Priya (Priyanka Chopra) from Singapore that begins the journey of the simpleton Krishna to the masked man Krrish. And there, he will also face the wily Dr. Arya (Naseerudin Shah).

The script is taut except for a slight sagging in the first half –which if reduced, could have kept the overall running time also less and more enjoyable. But once Krishna reaches Singapore, it goes into full ballistic. The script adequately peppers Rohit and Nisha’s reason-for-death at suitable places. And yes – an interesting point, which I enjoyed – the past about Rohit and what happens to him after KMG ends, has a very crucial role to play in this film; this is something that has not been talked about in promotions at all, but I feel this itself lends the film a solid weight. What is that? Well, I suggest you go and watch it and enjoy it unfold.

Of course, keeping in mind Indian sensibilities, the superhero is kept rooted in enough song-and-dance-and-emotion. Sensible? For this one, sort of – though I wish there was more of the ‘superhero’ than the normal ‘hero’. Here, the superhero has only a personal agenda. Perhaps if another sequel is made, they could take Krrish’s character further to ‘save the planet’.

The film’s stunts and special effects are extraordinary, especially in Hindi films context. For those who have grown up on Superman/Batman/ Spiderman/Matrix might find it simply ordinary. I had imagined that in sophisticated multiplex-era, the days of clapping at hero’s stunts would be over – but was pleasantly surprised to see a ring of spontaneous clapping when Krrish takes on a posse of villains in the climax.

Rakesh Roshan’s direction is able. He keeps a strong control on the proceedings, and the narrative pace is pretty even.

Hrithik’s performance is superb – in all his various avatars – though at times his constant ‘flying’ and ‘movement’ gets irritating. For example, in the song ‘Koi Tumsa Nahin’ (incidentally, that was the film’s working title) one just wishes that he would stand still instead of yet again dancing.  Priyanka plays a typical heroine and does well for herself, though she needs to do something about her dress-designer! Rekha and Naseeruddin Shah are seasoned performers, they are great.

Rajesh Roshan’s music lacks verve. Salim Sulaiman’s background score is good. Cinematography is awesome – especially the luxuriant and verdant mountain landscape has been captured in fine detail. As Priya says in the film – so soothing, so serene! Dialogues are ok. Editing is slick. Barring ‘Dil na diya’ I found the choreography jarring!

In all, Krrish is a good entertaining film and introduces a new genre to Hindi cinema.

Overall – Time Pass, Watch It!

I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
Welcome to India’s first superhero; and as that, melanoma visit Krrish does remarkably well. Rakesh Roshan’s films have always been fairly entertaining, grip including the ill-fated Kala Bazar and King Uncle. And now, he has improved vastly on the technical side which makes viewing more pleasurable.


Unless you are a hermit living in a cave, you would know that Krrish is a sequel to Roshan’s previous bumper hit Koi Mil Gaya – where in Rohit and Nisha’s son Krishna is born with all the powers that Jadoo, the extra terrestrial, had imparted Rohit with. Fearing that Krishna might fall into the same deadly fate’s trap as his father, Krishna’s grandmother Shalini Mehra (a suitably aged and wobbly Rekha) keeps her away from the world’s gaze. Krishna grows up in sylvan mountain surroundings, a sort of desi-Tarzan, only he has been given education. It’s a visit from Priya (Priyanka Chopra) from Singapore that begins the journey of the simpleton Krishna to the masked man Krrish. And there, he will also face the wily Dr. Arya (Naseerudin Shah).

The script is taut except for a slight sagging in the first half –which if reduced, could have kept the overall running time also less and more enjoyable. But once Krishna reaches Singapore, it goes into full ballistic. The script adequately peppers Rohit and Nisha’s reason-for-death at suitable places. And yes – an interesting point, which I enjoyed – the past about Rohit and what happens to him after KMG ends, has a very crucial role to play in this film; this is something that has not been talked about in promotions at all, but I feel this itself lends the film a solid weight. What is that? Well, I suggest you go and watch it and enjoy it unfold.

Of course, keeping in mind Indian sensibilities, the superhero is kept rooted in enough song-and-dance-and-emotion. Sensible? For this one, sort of – though I wish there was more of the ‘superhero’ than the normal ‘hero’. Here, the superhero has only a personal agenda. Perhaps if another sequel is made, they could take Krrish’s character further to ‘save the planet’.

The film’s stunts and special effects are extraordinary, especially in Hindi films context. For those who have grown up on Superman/Batman/ Spiderman/Matrix might find it simply ordinary. I had imagined that in sophisticated multiplex-era, the days of clapping at hero’s stunts would be over – but was pleasantly surprised to see a ring of spontaneous clapping when Krrish takes on a posse of villains in the climax.

Rakesh Roshan’s direction is able. He keeps a strong control on the proceedings, and the narrative pace is pretty even.

Hrithik’s performance is superb – in all his various avatars – though at times his constant ‘flying’ and ‘movement’ gets irritating. For example, in the song ‘Koi Tumsa Nahin’ (incidentally, that was the film’s working title) one just wishes that he would stand still instead of yet again dancing.  Priyanka plays a typical heroine and does well for herself, though she needs to do something about her dress-designer! Rekha and Naseeruddin Shah are seasoned performers, they are great.

Rajesh Roshan’s music lacks verve. Salim Sulaiman’s background score is good. Cinematography is awesome – especially the luxuriant and verdant mountain landscape has been captured in fine detail. As Priya says in the film – so soothing, so serene! Dialogues are ok. Editing is slick. Barring ‘Dil na diya’ I found the choreography jarring!

In all, Krrish is a good entertaining film and introduces a new genre to Hindi cinema.

Overall – Time Pass, Watch It!

I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
At last the clouds have gathered and rains are imminent. The last one week has been particularly bad. Power situation dipped to an all time low, pills
and all we heard through the black outs were news of one or the other power-station tripping and packing up. 

I have become a certified couch potato; or rather a ‘bed’ potato since my television is in the bedroom. After missing of television for more than a year, I took to watching it with a vengeance. But most viewing is restricted to movies and songs channels, with an occasional foray into news ones. To my horror I discovered that all the money spent on collecting DVD’s last year was sheer wastage since those movies keep repeating themselves ad nauseum. For example, I can puke now if someone so much as mentions the thought of watching No Entry – a movie that I thoroughly enjoyed earlier. Other than Sahara telecasting it alternatively on its both channels (Filmy and Sahara One) every other week, my cable-wallah has also gone overboard there. In fact, my cable-guy has a strange habit of showing those very same films a couple of days earlier that would in any case be shown on Max or Filmy the same week! 

I have an aversion towards all currently running serials. Nay, I absolutely abhor the entire Zee-Sony-Star Plus nexus, with the hatred targeted more towards the last one, whom I hold responsible for starting the trend of those horrifying saas-bahu serials. I can’t stand any program on Star Plus – every one of them, even that supposedly ‘different’ game show Jodi Kamaal Ki, seems to have similar look with bright gaudy colors and heavily dressed up ladies ready to burst into copious tears at any given instant. Even though I am not a football freak, but honestly I can kick anyone from Star’s programming department with a force that can get me a place in the next World Cup! 

The only good thing that ever came out from the Star-stable was The Great Indian Laughter Challenge Contest.. I had missed the first season, but was able to watch a large bulk of the second one. Opinions may differ on whether Rauf Lala deserved the crown or not, but I personally feel that the entire toppers lot including Khayali, Rajeev, Pratap Faujdar, the Pakistani jodi and, my personal favorite, Dr Tushhar were mindblowingly excellent! Together, they made Friday evenings funny and entertaining. 

After lambasting serials, I have to sheepishly confess that I started watching one with great interest. But then, Akela doesn’t seem to be your usual fare. There is heavy inspiration from M Night Shayamalan’s The Sixth Sense where the basic premise is concerned, but otherwise it seems to be on a different track.  The biggest relief? Any chances to slip into the saas-bahu syndrome were nipped in the bud with the mothers of both the hero and heroine dead in the first episode itself. Phew! I am keeping my fingers crossed that their ghosts will not start wearing outlandish bindis and scheming against each other to the tune of electronically generated swoosh-and-boom background score. Plus, the serial – like good ol’ days – will be aired once a week; that way, it’s easier to follow, and of course, it avoids overkill. 

Sudhanshu (Band of Boys, Yakeen) Panday plays the protagonist. He may not be the greatest actor around, but his personality and physique suit the role. Plus, I have seen Yakeen and bits of Pehchaan: The Face of Truth, and I feel there is a raw honesty in his performances reminiscent of Jackie Shroff in his younger days. 

Speaking of Jackie Shroff, what has he done to himself? Unlike his colleague Anil Kapoor, Jackie never exhibited the Machiavellian go-getter capacity. But at least he can take good care of his looks and locks! Since he never had the qualms to graduate to father roles, I am sure things wouldn’t be so hard up for him that he is forced to act in inane Z-grade flicks like Bhoot Unkle

Well, the clouds have darkened further, and any moment the welcome pitter-patter of rains will be heard. My player has also propititiously moved to ‘Yeh mausam bheega bheega hai, hawa bhi kuchh zyada zyada hai’ from Dharti. And before we have another power cut, let me publish this.
Welcome to India’s first superhero; and as that, melanoma visit Krrish does remarkably well. Rakesh Roshan’s films have always been fairly entertaining, grip including the ill-fated Kala Bazar and King Uncle. And now, he has improved vastly on the technical side which makes viewing more pleasurable.


Unless you are a hermit living in a cave, you would know that Krrish is a sequel to Roshan’s previous bumper hit Koi Mil Gaya – where in Rohit and Nisha’s son Krishna is born with all the powers that Jadoo, the extra terrestrial, had imparted Rohit with. Fearing that Krishna might fall into the same deadly fate’s trap as his father, Krishna’s grandmother Shalini Mehra (a suitably aged and wobbly Rekha) keeps her away from the world’s gaze. Krishna grows up in sylvan mountain surroundings, a sort of desi-Tarzan, only he has been given education. It’s a visit from Priya (Priyanka Chopra) from Singapore that begins the journey of the simpleton Krishna to the masked man Krrish. And there, he will also face the wily Dr. Arya (Naseerudin Shah).

The script is taut except for a slight sagging in the first half –which if reduced, could have kept the overall running time also less and more enjoyable. But once Krishna reaches Singapore, it goes into full ballistic. The script adequately peppers Rohit and Nisha’s reason-for-death at suitable places. And yes – an interesting point, which I enjoyed – the past about Rohit and what happens to him after KMG ends, has a very crucial role to play in this film; this is something that has not been talked about in promotions at all, but I feel this itself lends the film a solid weight. What is that? Well, I suggest you go and watch it and enjoy it unfold.

Of course, keeping in mind Indian sensibilities, the superhero is kept rooted in enough song-and-dance-and-emotion. Sensible? For this one, sort of – though I wish there was more of the ‘superhero’ than the normal ‘hero’. Here, the superhero has only a personal agenda. Perhaps if another sequel is made, they could take Krrish’s character further to ‘save the planet’.

The film’s stunts and special effects are extraordinary, especially in Hindi films context. For those who have grown up on Superman/Batman/ Spiderman/Matrix might find it simply ordinary. I had imagined that in sophisticated multiplex-era, the days of clapping at hero’s stunts would be over – but was pleasantly surprised to see a ring of spontaneous clapping when Krrish takes on a posse of villains in the climax.

Rakesh Roshan’s direction is able. He keeps a strong control on the proceedings, and the narrative pace is pretty even.

Hrithik’s performance is superb – in all his various avatars – though at times his constant ‘flying’ and ‘movement’ gets irritating. For example, in the song ‘Koi Tumsa Nahin’ (incidentally, that was the film’s working title) one just wishes that he would stand still instead of yet again dancing.  Priyanka plays a typical heroine and does well for herself, though she needs to do something about her dress-designer! Rekha and Naseeruddin Shah are seasoned performers, they are great.

Rajesh Roshan’s music lacks verve. Salim Sulaiman’s background score is good. Cinematography is awesome – especially the luxuriant and verdant mountain landscape has been captured in fine detail. As Priya says in the film – so soothing, so serene! Dialogues are ok. Editing is slick. Barring ‘Dil na diya’ I found the choreography jarring!

In all, Krrish is a good entertaining film and introduces a new genre to Hindi cinema.

Overall – Time Pass, Watch It!

I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
At last the clouds have gathered and rains are imminent. The last one week has been particularly bad. Power situation dipped to an all time low, pills
and all we heard through the black outs were news of one or the other power-station tripping and packing up. 

I have become a certified couch potato; or rather a ‘bed’ potato since my television is in the bedroom. After missing of television for more than a year, I took to watching it with a vengeance. But most viewing is restricted to movies and songs channels, with an occasional foray into news ones. To my horror I discovered that all the money spent on collecting DVD’s last year was sheer wastage since those movies keep repeating themselves ad nauseum. For example, I can puke now if someone so much as mentions the thought of watching No Entry – a movie that I thoroughly enjoyed earlier. Other than Sahara telecasting it alternatively on its both channels (Filmy and Sahara One) every other week, my cable-wallah has also gone overboard there. In fact, my cable-guy has a strange habit of showing those very same films a couple of days earlier that would in any case be shown on Max or Filmy the same week! 

I have an aversion towards all currently running serials. Nay, I absolutely abhor the entire Zee-Sony-Star Plus nexus, with the hatred targeted more towards the last one, whom I hold responsible for starting the trend of those horrifying saas-bahu serials. I can’t stand any program on Star Plus – every one of them, even that supposedly ‘different’ game show Jodi Kamaal Ki, seems to have similar look with bright gaudy colors and heavily dressed up ladies ready to burst into copious tears at any given instant. Even though I am not a football freak, but honestly I can kick anyone from Star’s programming department with a force that can get me a place in the next World Cup! 

The only good thing that ever came out from the Star-stable was The Great Indian Laughter Challenge Contest.. I had missed the first season, but was able to watch a large bulk of the second one. Opinions may differ on whether Rauf Lala deserved the crown or not, but I personally feel that the entire toppers lot including Khayali, Rajeev, Pratap Faujdar, the Pakistani jodi and, my personal favorite, Dr Tushhar were mindblowingly excellent! Together, they made Friday evenings funny and entertaining. 

After lambasting serials, I have to sheepishly confess that I started watching one with great interest. But then, Akela doesn’t seem to be your usual fare. There is heavy inspiration from M Night Shayamalan’s The Sixth Sense where the basic premise is concerned, but otherwise it seems to be on a different track.  The biggest relief? Any chances to slip into the saas-bahu syndrome were nipped in the bud with the mothers of both the hero and heroine dead in the first episode itself. Phew! I am keeping my fingers crossed that their ghosts will not start wearing outlandish bindis and scheming against each other to the tune of electronically generated swoosh-and-boom background score. Plus, the serial – like good ol’ days – will be aired once a week; that way, it’s easier to follow, and of course, it avoids overkill. 

Sudhanshu (Band of Boys, Yakeen) Panday plays the protagonist. He may not be the greatest actor around, but his personality and physique suit the role. Plus, I have seen Yakeen and bits of Pehchaan: The Face of Truth, and I feel there is a raw honesty in his performances reminiscent of Jackie Shroff in his younger days. 

Speaking of Jackie Shroff, what has he done to himself? Unlike his colleague Anil Kapoor, Jackie never exhibited the Machiavellian go-getter capacity. But at least he can take good care of his looks and locks! Since he never had the qualms to graduate to father roles, I am sure things wouldn’t be so hard up for him that he is forced to act in inane Z-grade flicks like Bhoot Unkle

Well, the clouds have darkened further, and any moment the welcome pitter-patter of rains will be heard. My player has also propititiously moved to ‘Yeh mausam bheega bheega hai, hawa bhi kuchh zyada zyada hai’ from Dharti. And before we have another power cut, let me publish this.
I had written the following post two years back (published on my older blog). The second paragraph is uncannily true again. The weathermen went beating their drums heralding monsoon arrival on 29th June. I guess all that noise scared the clouds away. The past two days have been unnervingly enervating and boiling hot. To add to woes the humidity is high which saps out any remaining energy. If that wasn’t enough, ambulance the news is full of excessive Mumbai rains – adding salt to burning wounds!

Anyways, mind you all enjoy this re-heated post:


Curling up on a comfortable chair, with a warm cup of tea, hot sumptuous pakoras with teekha chutney, watching the rains pitter-patter on the balcony, smelling the aroma of the fresh wet earth, feeling the cool light breeze tickle the skin, sensing the joyous dance of the stark dark greenery…monsoons bid me! 

Alas, the monsoons are again late in Delhi; it has become an irritating trend with the Rain Gods to bypass Delhi every two years. I yearn for the therapeutic showers to cleanse away the curse of the summers; and when one hears of their delightful foray in other parts of the country, the heart yearns more. 

No other season (apart from spring) has motivated authors, poets, lyricists and artists more. There is an irrepressible charm in the black clouds that envelope the sullen skies with their soft, moist embrace. Rains can depict sadness and joy; love and hate; consummation and separation; tranquility and anger, with an equal finesse. 

Here I pick up a few of my favorite stuff from the rains: 

Book: A Passage to India, by EM Forester. In this pre-independence India novel, the three main seasons of India are used to the most effective tool. The trauma and trouble of the lead characters are linked to the changing weather conditions. On a hot, innervating summer day Adela Quested makes a foul charge of being molested by Aziz. Trouble begins. The same gets sorted out, and smoothened, only when the skies open and give their blessings through the invigorating showers. The Janmashtmi festival is also beautifully woven in; it’s the time of the birth of the Lord, the washing away of sins, the cleansing of past wrong-doings; the rejuvenation of the earth, and the mind of Adela. It is indeed a beautiful allegory; a must read. 

Films: So many films have used rains to heighten passion and anger. If I start to list out the scenes where the thunder is blasting away in the background, while the hero/heroine raves and rants, the list would be endless. One film, which I recall, that had the rains playing a mind-blowing role in the set up is Aitbaar. This Dimple-Raj Babbar murder mystery, plagiarized from Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, uses the rains as a compelling device to heighten the suspense, ambience and feel. 

Songs: Again, a list that can go on and on. However, here are my top 5 five favorite numbers: Rimjhim gire saawan (Manzil), Megha chhaye aadhi raat (Sharmilee), Jhooti mooti mitwa (Rudaali), Rim jhim rim jhim (1942-A Love Story) and Koi ladki hai jab wo hansti hai (Dil to Paagal Hai). 

The funniest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Barsaat mein jab aayega saawan ka mahina (Maa)- can anyone make head or tail of this? 

The sleaziest ‘rain’ song ever heard: Bheegi hun main barsaat mein (Karz Chukana Hai). It had lines that went itne chikne chikne ang yeh sunehre, paani ki boond padhe paani nahi thehre…quite slippery, indeed!
At last the clouds have gathered and rains are imminent. The last one week has been particularly bad. Power situation dipped to an all time low, pills
and all we heard through the black outs were news of one or the other power-station tripping and packing up. 

I have become a certified couch potato; or rather a ‘bed’ potato since my television is in the bedroom. After missing of television for more than a year, I took to watching it with a vengeance. But most viewing is restricted to movies and songs channels, with an occasional foray into news ones. To my horror I discovered that all the money spent on collecting DVD’s last year was sheer wastage since those movies keep repeating themselves ad nauseum. For example, I can puke now if someone so much as mentions the thought of watching No Entry – a movie that I thoroughly enjoyed earlier. Other than Sahara telecasting it alternatively on its both channels (Filmy and Sahara One) every other week, my cable-wallah has also gone overboard there. In fact, my cable-guy has a strange habit of showing those very same films a couple of days earlier that would in any case be shown on Max or Filmy the same week! 

I have an aversion towards all currently running serials. Nay, I absolutely abhor the entire Zee-Sony-Star Plus nexus, with the hatred targeted more towards the last one, whom I hold responsible for starting the trend of those horrifying saas-bahu serials. I can’t stand any program on Star Plus – every one of them, even that supposedly ‘different’ game show Jodi Kamaal Ki, seems to have similar look with bright gaudy colors and heavily dressed up ladies ready to burst into copious tears at any given instant. Even though I am not a football freak, but honestly I can kick anyone from Star’s programming department with a force that can get me a place in the next World Cup! 

The only good thing that ever came out from the Star-stable was The Great Indian Laughter Challenge Contest.. I had missed the first season, but was able to watch a large bulk of the second one. Opinions may differ on whether Rauf Lala deserved the crown or not, but I personally feel that the entire toppers lot including Khayali, Rajeev, Pratap Faujdar, the Pakistani jodi and, my personal favorite, Dr Tushhar were mindblowingly excellent! Together, they made Friday evenings funny and entertaining. 

After lambasting serials, I have to sheepishly confess that I started watching one with great interest. But then, Akela doesn’t seem to be your usual fare. There is heavy inspiration from M Night Shayamalan’s The Sixth Sense where the basic premise is concerned, but otherwise it seems to be on a different track.  The biggest relief? Any chances to slip into the saas-bahu syndrome were nipped in the bud with the mothers of both the hero and heroine dead in the first episode itself. Phew! I am keeping my fingers crossed that their ghosts will not start wearing outlandish bindis and scheming against each other to the tune of electronically generated swoosh-and-boom background score. Plus, the serial – like good ol’ days – will be aired once a week; that way, it’s easier to follow, and of course, it avoids overkill. 

Sudhanshu (Band of Boys, Yakeen) Panday plays the protagonist. He may not be the greatest actor around, but his personality and physique suit the role. Plus, I have seen Yakeen and bits of Pehchaan: The Face of Truth, and I feel there is a raw honesty in his performances reminiscent of Jackie Shroff in his younger days. 

Speaking of Jackie Shroff, what has he done to himself? Unlike his colleague Anil Kapoor, Jackie never exhibited the Machiavellian go-getter capacity. But at least he can take good care of his looks and locks! Since he never had the qualms to graduate to father roles, I am sure things wouldn’t be so hard up for him that he is forced to act in inane Z-grade flicks like Bhoot Unkle

Well, the clouds have darkened further, and any moment the welcome pitter-patter of rains will be heard. My player has also propititiously moved to ‘Yeh mausam bheega bheega hai, hawa bhi kuchh zyada zyada hai’ from Dharti. And before we have another power cut, let me publish this.

Aajao ke sab milke rab se dua maange
Jeevan mein sukoon chaahen
Chaahat mein wafaa maangein
Haalaat badalne mein ab der na ho maalik
Jo dekh chuke phir andher na ho maalik

Ek tu hi bharosa
Ek tu hi sahaara
Is tere jahaan mein
Nahi koi hamaara
Hey Ishwar Ya Allah yeh pukaar sunle
Hey Ishwar Ya Allah hey daata

Humse na dekha jaaye
Barbaadiyon ka sama
Ujadi hui basti mein
Yeh tadap rahe insaan
Nanhe jismon ke tukde
Liye khadi ek maa
Baarood ke dhuen mein
Tu hi bol jaayen kahan

Ek tu hi bharosa
Ek tu hi sahaaraa…

Naadan hain hum to maalik
Kyun di humein yeh sazaa
Yahaan hai sabhi ke dil mein
Nafrat ka zahar bhara
Inhe phir se yaad dilade
Sabak wohi pyaar ke
Ban jaaye gulshan phir se
Kaanton bhari yeh duniya

Ek tu hi bharosa
Ek tu hi sahaaraa…

– Lyric: Majrooh Sultanpuri
– Singer: Lata Mangeshkar

My prayers and wishes with all Mumbaikars in their tough times.


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14 Responses to “Ek Tu Hi Bharosa”

  1. Anz says:

    So are mine with them, more so to provide strength to all those who have lost their near and dear ones and innocent sufferers! God is the last hope!

  2. Mehak says:

    Where are you God ?????

  3. mannat says:

    Really..in such situations, you wonder where is God?

  4. Poonam says:

    Our prayers and blessings are with all of Mumbai as well. God Bless! Jai Hind.

  5. priyangini says:

    It hurts. But it won’t break Mumbai. I just came to office in a thoroughly crowded First Class Ladies compartment in a Chruchgate Fast. Life throbs with ferocity everywhere. This city epitomises the words ‘the show must go on’.

  6. Manish says:

    My prayers too.

    But Priyangini, what about the life of those have lost a dear one, bread winner, or a limb? Life doesn’t go on for them. It just creeps.

    Certainly it won’t break. People can’t afford to break, otherwise they will have nothing to eat!

  7. Navjot says:

    Well! People will forget all of it in a few days. Yes, the ones who have lost someone near or dear will not – rest all will. Once I read somewhere – I don’t have the exact words now but it was something like – if one known to you is dead, it’ll be important to you – rest if 10,100,1000 are dead ….its just a number …it could have been 11,135,1945… it won’t make much difference…

  8. Navjot says:

    DOT has taken outa directive to all ISPs to block the blogs. I can’t even access my own blog 🙁

  9. Hiren says:

    Wonderful. Fantastic lyrics. Its been a long time since we last met, Deepak. Not been blogging of late. Its a good think you shifted to wordpress because getting your rediffblog on screen is sometimes a real pain.

    Nice lyrics I must say. I only get funny thoughts in Hindi. Wish I could write like that.

  10. Navjot – Is that why i coudnt access any blogger blogs today? But rediff blogs are working… Strange… are we living in some police state? What’s the reason?

  11. Sum says:

    Mumbaikars have of course overcome that and making the show go on…… But then, those hundreds of people injured for lifetime, and still suffering in hospitals? Those hundreds of families which will never be able to be the same again??? Hmm…..
    As Navjot has pointed out, this time i am feeling more emotional abt the issue as i too underwent a very small bit of tension (as mentioned in my blog)
    May God give them the strength to endure these …….

  12. Sum says:

    Yeah…… Blogspot is one of the 22 sites the Centre has asked Internet service providers to block.
    Supposed to be some kind of censorship!!! What crap…

  13. Mehak says:

    a saw a new post here sometime back….n now when i came back to comment ..its no where to be seen…grrrr

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